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CAWDB Sets Priorities for the Next Two Years

The Capital Area Workforce Development Board has selected 3 priorities for the current, and next, fiscal year: Apprenticeship, Advocacy, and Advancing Youth (Unifying Goal.)

Work in these areas support the purpose of CAWDB, which is to
— have a workforce system that is responsive to the needs of the local area,
— connect private and public resources necessary to fill those needs,
— help individuals attain skills necessary for gainful employment, and
— assist employers with maintaining a skilled workforce so that they can compete in a global economy.

Apprenticeships are internationally recognized as an effective way for employers to create the workforce they need while the employee learns and increases their skill levels. The value of apprenticeships and processes for implementing (businesses) and progressing through apprenticeship programs (job seekers/employees), must be understood by entire community. This committee’s work supports all 4 areas.

Advocacy involves actively garnering support for CAWD and workforce development so that resources are always available for training and job programs. And as a major talent source, youth and young adults require special attention if they are to meet the ever-changing skill requirements of today’s workplace.

Anyone interested in participating in the work of either committee on an ad hoc basis should contact the Executive Director – pat.sturdivant@wakegov.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Illustration of prisoner and family done in retro style.

Wake County Inmate Employment & Education Initiative

More than 500 ex-offenders entered in the NCWorks system last program year, an indication of the necessity for employment services geared specifically for this population. CAWD already holds resource fairs featuring multiple community organizations at the Raleigh career center. Now, CAWD has assumed a lead role in helping the Wake County Detention Center provide more seamless workforce and support services for inmates serving short sentences at the center.

Participants should be able to progress through a series of offerings that help them with life skills, personal improvement, and prepare them for  long-term success in the work world.  Activities should lead to jobs that can support a family and offer career potential. Not only must inmates be able to access educational opportunities that lead to high school completion and post secondary credentials, the program must offer a sustainable transition and reentry process that ensures coordinated employment and supportive services for offenders released from detention.

NCWorks Career Centers will play an integral role during the incarceration period as well as after release.

 

 

 

 

GPS

Game-changing Pathways Strategies: Know the Terrain

Workforce development impacts the economic landscape of the region. The Triangle Regional Career Pathways Collaborative, which consists of CAWD, Durham, and Kerr-Tar workforce development boards, is holding it’s first professional development series for those who have a role in career advisement.

Career Development Coordinators (CDCs) AudienceQ&Afrom the region’s public schools and career advisers from community colleges will join workforce development professionals for a 1/2 day program about where the jobs are, where the jobs will be, regional trends affecting the type of workers businesses are looking for, and much more.

One of the main highlights will be a Q&A with individuals that work in high-demand occupations within the region’s target industries. This will enable attendees to gauge real-world knowledge, skills, abilities, personal qualities and attitudes necessary to excel in those careers.

If your career advisers would like to attend, they can register here.

 

Chris Johnson, Johnston County Economic Development

At the Table For Economic Developers

ashley_jobcreation-investment

Economic developers have a big job – getting businesses to come (attraction), to stay (retention), and grow (expansion).  Often, this includes understanding and communicating information about the current and future workforce, and the historic and projected performance of various industries. CAWD believes strongly in economic development through workforce excellence, the result of which should be a strong talent pipeline that will feed the needs of employers regardless of where they are in the business cycle.

Economic developers are an important link to the business community. Whether we are providing letters of support that articulate services we will provide their business clients, or they are partnering with us on grant applications and industry projects, working together is the best means of conveying a commitment to their success.

CAWD has been involved in several economic development projects, including the expansion of Relias Learning which will bring 450 new jobs to Cary, Novo Nordisk’s expansion that will bring 600 jobs to Johnston County, and Silicon Valley start-up Walk Me’s new location in downtown Raleigh.

 

 

Pictured:
Chris Johnson, Director, Johnston County Economic Development
Adrienne Cole, Executive Director, Wake County Economic Development