Category Archives: Uncategorized

Partner Meetings

One of the things CAWD and our partners have been working on is a common referral process for use throughout the  Capital Area NCWorks Career Center System.  In the May meeting,  training was provided as a part of implementing the new referral process. Use of the referral process includes giving partner agencies access to NCWorks Online, something previously not allowed but was critical to making the process as smooth as possible.

In the June meeting, there was discussion around cost sharing and more ways we can leverage one another’s strengths in service to our customers.

Strong partnerships are critical to workforce development. If you haven’t attended a partner’s meeting, we hope you can make one in the future. More meetings are being scheduled, so be on the lookout for your invitation.

Finish Line Grant – Wake Tech and Johnston Community College

Are you a Wake Tech or Johnston Community College student who needs up to $1000 in emergency assistance to finish your education? The Finish Line Grant could help! We cover expenses such as vehicle repairs, utility bills, childcare, housing assistance, books, school supplies, medical emergencies, and more. Complete the one-page application today!

WTCC Finish Line Application

JCC Finish Line Application

For more information or to submit your completed application, please contact Brent Royal at 919-664-7965 or email brent.royal@wakegov.com.

Capital Connections Community News

We often hear that workforce development programs are some of the best kept secrets in the Triangle. People are paying good money for things that are available for FREE! “Capital Connections” is being published to change that. It is a quick-read community newsletter for our residents and small businesses with information that ultimately will allow everyone to succeed and participate in the economic vitality of the region!

Capital Connections – April 2019

Celebrating YouthBuild Milestones

An awards banquet was held recently at the City of Raleigh Museum to celebrate achievements of Capital Area’s YouthBuild participants.  Friends and family of the participants attended as well as program partners from Habitat for Humanity, NC Association of Building Contractors, City of Raleigh, and NCWorks NextGen.

Certificates and plaques were awarded for Outstanding Achievement, Perseverance, and Leadership. One participant received a trophy after being voted MVP – Most Valuable Participant.

Some award recipients shared personal stories about the positive effects of YouthBuild on their lives. Done properly, graduates leave prepared for success in higher education, apprenticeships, and in the workplace.

As the final cohort begins, we are confident that program goals will be met and participants will see results from their hard work.

Here are outcomes to date:

Participants: 45

  • 24 have entered jobs, apprenticeships, or higher education
  • 42 earned PACT construction certification
  • 17 have completed 320 hours of work experience
  • 6 have earned their GEDs

Youth Summit Says “Raise Your Game!”

Youth and young adults that participate in workforce programs across the state descended on the Embassy Suites in Cary for the 13th Annual Youth Summit. Over 360 youth and staff signed up. Governor Cooper could not make it to the event but did send a well-received recorded greeting welcoming them to the summit.

In keeping with the “Raise Your Game” theme, several hands-on and interactive activities were featured to challenge and motivate attendees, including college tours of Shaw University, Louisburg College and NC Central University. Workshops conducted by Leading to Change included: 

• Finding Your Spark
• Making Your Movement
• Shark Tank Got Nothing on Me

Attendees also enjoyed an evening Gala, an American Idol-style talent show and several games.

At the end of the 2-day summit, young people walked away with new tools, ideas, and skills needed to keep their goals on point. Congratulations to all of the NextGen staff for planning an outstanding event!

Participants needed for Youthbuild education and training program

Raleigh, NC, January 30, 2018 – Capital Area Workforce Development (CAWD) is looking for youth and young adults to participate in YouthBuild. YouthBuild provides education, construction skills training, and job placement opportunities to eligible 16-24 year olds from areas of Raleigh with higher poverty rates and unemployment. Participants will build affordable homes for low-income families during the training.

“In Wake County alone, the construction industry is projected to grow over 2,000 jobs in the next five years, but employers have jobs they can’t fill today. This program is one way to help fill that talent pipeline and connect young people with limited education, training and work experience to a field with long-term career potential. The fact that the hands-on portion of their learning will occur as they work on affordable housing is really the icing on the cake,” said Pat Sturdivant, Executive Director at CAWD.

Partners for the project include City of Raleigh, Habitat for Humanity of Wake County, North Carolina Home Builders Association, Associated Builders and Contractors – Carolina Chapter, and NCWorks. Interested applicants or their parents can access all eligibility requirements and additional information at Capitalareancworks.com.

About Capital Area Workforce Development Board
The Capital Area Workforce Development Board is a public-private partnership that focuses on economic development by offering services that provide employers with skilled workers and offer citizens training and employment opportunities that promote job satisfaction and economic stability.
Media Inquiries: Brenda Wilkerson, Communications Manager
919.856.5390
brenda.wilkerson@wakegov.com

CAWDB Sets Priorities for the Next Two Years

The Capital Area Workforce Development Board has selected 3 priorities for the current, and next, fiscal year: Apprenticeship, Advocacy, and Advancing Youth (Unifying Goal.)

Work in these areas support the purpose of CAWDB, which is to
— have a workforce system that is responsive to the needs of the local area,
— connect private and public resources necessary to fill those needs,
— help individuals attain skills necessary for gainful employment, and
— assist employers with maintaining a skilled workforce so that they can compete in a global economy.

Apprenticeships are internationally recognized as an effective way for employers to create the workforce they need while the employee learns and increases their skill levels. The value of apprenticeships and processes for implementing (businesses) and progressing through apprenticeship programs (job seekers/employees), must be understood by entire community. This committee’s work supports all 4 areas.

Advocacy involves actively garnering support for CAWD and workforce development so that resources are always available for training and job programs. And as a major talent source, youth and young adults require special attention if they are to meet the ever-changing skill requirements of today’s workplace.

Anyone interested in participating in the work of either committee on an ad hoc basis should contact the Executive Director – pat.sturdivant@wakegov.com.

 

 

 

 

 

Wake County Inmate Employment & Education Initiative

More than 500 ex-offenders entered in the NCWorks system last program year, an indication of the necessity for employment services geared specifically for this population. CAWD already holds resource fairs featuring multiple community organizations at the Raleigh career center. Now, CAWD has assumed a lead role in helping the Wake County Detention Center provide more seamless workforce and support services for inmates serving short sentences at the center.

Participants should be able to progress through a series of offerings that help them with life skills, personal improvement, and prepare them for  long-term success in the work world.  Activities should lead to jobs that can support a family and offer career potential. Not only must inmates be able to access educational opportunities that lead to high school completion and post secondary credentials, the program must offer a sustainable transition and reentry process that ensures coordinated employment and supportive services for offenders released from detention.

NCWorks Career Centers will play an integral role during the incarceration period as well as after release.

 

 

 

 

Game-changing Pathways Strategies: Know the Terrain

Workforce development impacts the economic landscape of the region. The Triangle Regional Career Pathways Collaborative, which consists of CAWD, Durham, and Kerr-Tar workforce development boards, is holding it’s first professional development series for those who have a role in career advisement.

Career Development Coordinators (CDCs) AudienceQ&Afrom the region’s public schools and career advisers from community colleges will join workforce development professionals for a 1/2 day program about where the jobs are, where the jobs will be, regional trends affecting the type of workers businesses are looking for, and much more.

One of the main highlights will be a Q&A with individuals that work in high-demand occupations within the region’s target industries. This will enable attendees to gauge real-world knowledge, skills, abilities, personal qualities and attitudes necessary to excel in those careers.

If your career advisers would like to attend, they can register here.

 

At the Table For Economic Developers

ashley_jobcreation-investment

Economic developers have a big job – getting businesses to come (attraction), to stay (retention), and grow (expansion).  Often, this includes understanding and communicating information about the current and future workforce, and the historic and projected performance of various industries. CAWD believes strongly in economic development through workforce excellence, the result of which should be a strong talent pipeline that will feed the needs of employers regardless of where they are in the business cycle.

Economic developers are an important link to the business community. Whether we are providing letters of support that articulate services we will provide their business clients, or they are partnering with us on grant applications and industry projects, working together is the best means of conveying a commitment to their success.

CAWD has been involved in several economic development projects, including the expansion of Relias Learning which will bring 450 new jobs to Cary, Novo Nordisk’s expansion that will bring 600 jobs to Johnston County, and Silicon Valley start-up Walk Me’s new location in downtown Raleigh.

 

 

Pictured:
Chris Johnson, Director, Johnston County Economic Development
Adrienne Cole, Executive Director, Wake County Economic Development